This part of the website is designed to help you develop your thinking and writing style.

Study skills are often ignored by many students (a common attitude is that ‘I know how to write') but this is probably unwise: even if you understand something, being able to convince someone else (e.g. a tutor or examiner) that you do is quite another matter.

Students arrive at university with a wide variety of essay experience: some will have done one, two or even three arts subjects at A-level, while others might not have written an essay since GCSE (or even before). The art of writing an economics essay at university is quite different than that required of an A-level English student though, so the advantage that arts students might feel they have is probably illusory.

A new dilemma also occurs when you write an Economics essay at University: referencing. The importance of referencing will be stressed to you throughout your University life as it is imperative to research, essays, articles and projects.

Box: ‘Blagging'

Many students boast of being able to ‘blag' - writing an essay with little knowledge of a subject and normally doing ok.

This tacitly acknowledges the importance of good writing skills. In fact, blagging can only get you so far (and many students claim to ‘blag' to cover up for when they've revised well or else it seems like they're putting too much effort in).

You need a solid base of knowledge (and some prior thoughts on a subject) to write a convincing essay. But you also need to be able to write well. Poor English, structure and argument will obscure the fact you understand something.

This section draws heavily on the work of some academics from the LSE - Margaret Bray, Susie Laurence and Neil Mclean. It is worth looking at their original work - it contains many useful examples of good and bad writing.

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